Division of Social Studies

Division of Social Studies

Contact Us

For more information about the Division of Social Studies, contact:

Robert Culp, Division Chair
Phone: 845-758-7395
E-mail: culp@bard.edu

Contact Us

Gregory B. Moynahan, Chair of the Division of Social Studies; Associate Professor of History; Director, Historical Studies; Codirector, Science, Technology, and Society

    Divisional News

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    Bard's Hannah Arendt Center Announces 2014 Thinking Challenge Winners

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    Bard Is "One Big Think Tank": Carl Amritt '17 Combines Academics and Community Engagement

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    Bard's Model United Nations Team Competes in Northeast Regional Model Arab League

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    History Professor Richard Aldous's Bestselling Biography of Ryanair Founder Tony Ryan Published in United Kingdom

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    Bard Model UN Participates in Security Council Simulation at Yale

About the Division of Social Studies

The Division of Social Studies offers academic programs in anthropology, economics, economics and finance, history, philosophy, political studies, religion, and sociology. Additional courses are available through interdivisional programs and concentrations. Students are advised to take courses from a range of fields in the division in order to develop a comprehensive perspective on humanity in both contemporary and historical contexts. By applying what they have learned of general philosophical, historical, and scientific methods and of particular research methods and interpretations, students will be able to focus on some aspect of the diversity of human cultures and civilizations, institutions, values, and beliefs. Although the main emphasis in the division is on a liberal arts curriculum, students are encouraged to design pro-grams to satisfy personal needs and interests in preparation for work in graduate or professional school or a profession requiring no further training.

Our Programs:

The Division of Social Studies offers concentrations in the following areas:

Course Work and Requirements

Typically, courses in the Upper College are seminars, in which the student is expected to participate actively. Advisory conferences, tutorials, fieldwork, and independent research prepare the student for the Senior Project. The Senior Project may take any form appropriate to the student’s field, subject, and methodology; most are research projects, but a project may take the form of a critical review of literature, a close textual analysis, a series of related essays, or even a translation.